If you want simple crash reporting functionality for your android app consider using by ligi.
github.com/ligi/tracedroid

Crash reports are super useful, if only for being able to see the stacktraces of my own apps without connecting to a computer.

Tracedroid is super simple (~100 LOC or so), requires 2 lines of code to set it up in your app and yet it has a number of benefits over a lot of the far more complex libraries (at least for my usecases.)

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Quoting from the readme:

Send traces via email, pros:

* no need for internet permission
* having a email adress of the sender to contact the user after e.g. the bugfix
* no problem when there is no internet at the moment
* user is able to write some more info into the stacktrace mail
* no need for extra server backend

(and ) use in email only mode which behaves very similar then. is still a more complex dependency, so if you don't need any of the extended functionality, it might be a bit overkill.

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@Bubu

> having a email adress of the sender to contact the user after e.g. the bugfix

If a requirement, that's not a pro, because #privacy in general and #GDPR in particular.

If optional, OK.

@0 Well for sending an email, you need an email address, that's pretty much not optional.

Optional is sending that email in the first place of course.

@0 In other words: this will not send emails on your behalf, it'll open your email program, prefill the stacktrace and recipient for you and let's you send the bugreport to the developer, optionally adding some additional context on what you were doing.

@Bubu

Ok, I think I have come across it. I must say, as a user I won't divulge my #email address to some random developer. And as a one-time developer, I'd have felt very uneasy about soliciting personal data from users, especially when it's not in any way relevant to the matter at hand.

An API or sending via a predefined, developer-controlled email would be acceptable.

Not trying to piss on your parade, I just suspect I'm not the only user who feels this way about his #privacy.

@0
> as a user I won't divulge my address to some random developer

I can certainly respect that choice. There's always the option to report bugs via the bugtracker instead. (You can copy the stracktrace from the draft email then. Or send it to yourself instead.)

I'm just not interested in receiving crash reports without a way to follow up with the sender. These are 95% useless and just waste time.

@0 anonymous crash reports become useful when you 1) get a lot of them and can do frequency analysis in which are the most common.
And 2) you'll need to add a lot more tracing code to your app such that you know what the user was doing before the crash without having to rely on them telling you. Which I find a lot worse than having to send an email.

@Bubu

> I'm just not interested in receiving crash reports without a way to follow up with the sender.

Consider this from the point of view of the user. Would he *want* to spend time debugging your app, useful as it might be?

The answer is: generally not. They're happy to let you know there's a problem with it but for every user that's willing to engage in communication you have many others that would rather not. You're missing all those signals.

@Bubu

If you implement an “anonymous first” approach, e.g. as outlined above, you still can give the user the option to provide a form of contact; perhaps something less personal than an email address (anonymous #mastodon account, forum handle, #xmpp, throwaway email not ordinarily configured in your email client, …) This might even reassure the users that you care about their privacy and make them more likely to contact you in the first place, and you're still free to ignore anonymous reports

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