FRA's @MichaelCJT@twitter.com met today with @OSCE@twitter.com @OSCE_RFoM@twitter.com Media Freedom Representative Teresa Ribeiro to discuss challenges to #MediaFreedom & #JournalistSafety in Europe.

They focused on the impact of the war in #Ukraine & #disinformation.

See our work: fra.europa.eu/en/news/2022/wha

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@FRA
One of the big threats to media freedom is .

Imagine a situation like the ABC in Australia was raided, except it's a media organization in Europe that Europol doesn't like.

theguardian.com/media/2019/jun

@FRA
Or a journalist investigating a corrupt government in an EU country, like say....

Malta.

Imagine any journalists private messages being trawled by Europol. Then perhaps passed on as that journalist/activist is considered a trouble maker. will have a chilling effect for whistleblowers.

bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-50

As @jens asked can we have a statement from FRA about and the massive threat to human rights that it is?

@onepict @jens I can't understand this proposal. The EU is trying to "solve" a problem by not doing it and creating another one in the process. Do they really think a backdoor in encryption can only be accessed by them?! I'm baffled!

@brunomiguel
Every now and then governments and LEO want to enable the equivalent of crocodile clips to listen in to our coms like they did on the phonelines.

I think they are well aware that other organisations can listen in. They just want to listen in to us and prevent the general population organising for change of any kind as its a threat to their status quo.
@jens

@onepict @jens wouldn't be surprised if that was the case, to be honest. everything goes to keep the status quo

@brunomiguel @jens
But this is why it's important for us all to try and improve people's digital literacy. Because more and more of our lives are affected by our online interactions.

The real life consequences from our virtual lives will endanger people, so they need more information to be able to quantify the risk.

@brunomiguel @jens
And the thing is, the status quo works for most people, until there's a change in the law that may factor into your life, or someone you likes life.

But if there's no way to protest, or challenge those consequences you are stuck.

Folk on the edges of the law, or society who have been there know what's comming. They are living the consequences.

@brunomiguel @jens
Because you never get away from those consequences, even if you improve your situation, the idea of a status quo is revealed to be a lie.

You've stumbled out of platos cave.

@brunomiguel @jens
Plus banning or limited E2EE encryption is kinda pointless. Because there will be a generation of kids who know not to trust the platforms. They will use social steganography to pass messages with their own language of shared references to hide meaning.

spectra.video/w/aMVN2D4Nt6jSG2

@onepict @jens new systems will probably also be developed to fight the privacy-invasion law.
this shouldn't be needed. people should always have the right to privacy. i don't have nothing to hide but i still want my privacy guaranteed. if we, common citizens, have our messages accessible by anyone who knows the backdoor, so will the politicians' messages be accessible.
this helps no one and it hurts everyone

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